March 25, 2017

Installing Puppet Master with Foreman frontend on CentOS 5.5

In this CentOS 5.5 tutorial we will be installing Foreman on a CentOS 5.5 i386 server including Puppet Master and Puppet client. The assumption is that you have a basic to medium understanding of the software required but if you follow this tutorial you should be able to complete the task successfully.

A bit on the software that we’ll be using:

Foreman
Foreman is aimed to be a Single Address For All Machines Life Cycle Management.

Foreman integrates with Puppet (and acts as web front end to it).

Foreman takes care of bare bone provisioning until the point puppet is running, allowing Puppet to do what it does best.

Foreman shows you Systems Inventory (based on Facter) and provides real time information about hosts status based on Puppet reports.

Foreman creates everything you need when adding a new machine to your network. It’s goal being automatically managing everything you would normally manage manually – that would eventually include DNS, DHCP, TFTP, PuppetCA, CMDB and everything else you might consider useful.

With Foreman You Can Always Rebuild Your Machines From Scratch!

Foreman is designed to work in a large enterprise, where multiple domains, subnets and puppetmasters are required.

http://theforeman.org/
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Dell and CentOS the Perfect Combination

A quick post to share this mostly unknown gem that Dell manages it’s own Open Manage Linux Repository.

Read more: http://linux.dell.com/wiki/index.php/Repository/OMSA

To get your CentOS server installed with Server Administrator set up the Dell Open Manage Repository like so:

Then install the Server Administrator

Finally browse to your newly installed Open Manage Server Administrator and monitor your Dell hardware.

https://your.Centos.Server:1311/

Log on screen – Use your root username and password

Dell Open Manage Server Administrator

Main Screen after log on

Dell Open Manage Server Administrator Main

TIP: After installing the Dell Server Administrator get your service tag number from your CentOS Linux server by running

Installing Smokeping on CentOS 5.5

In this CentOS 5.5 tutorial we will be installing Smokeping and SmokeTrace on a CentOS 5.5 i386 server. The assumption is that you have a basic to medium understanding of Apache but if you follow this tutorial you should be able to complete the task successfully.

A bit on the software that we’ll be using:

Smokeping
SmokePing keeps track of your network latency:

* Best of breed latency visualisation.
* Interactive graph explorer.
* Wide range of latency measurment plugins.
* Master/Slave System for distributed measurement.
* Highly configurable alerting system.
* Live Latency Charts with the most ‘interesting’ graphs.
* Free and OpenSource Software written in Perl written by Tobi Oetiker, the creator of MRTG and RRDtool

http://oss.oetiker.ch/smokeping/

Preliminary Note:
I am using a CentOS 5.5 i386 base installation in this tutorial.

* www.how2centos.com (IP 10.0.0.100): CentOS 5.5 i386 base installation

Lets begin by installing the framework required by Smokeping.

:epel-c5_32:
:rpmf-c5_32:

Replace this:

With This:

or you can Patch the file:

Replace this:

With this:

or you can Patch the file:

Change this:

To this:

or you can Patch the file:

change > #AddHandler cgi-script .cgi
to > AddHandler cgi-script .cgi

Under <Directory “/var/www/html”>

change > Options Indexes FollowSymLinks
to > Options Indexes FollowSymLinks ExecCGI

Change this:

To this:

or you can Patch the file:

Change this:

To this:

Lets create a basic Config file for Smokeping to get started:

Lets create a service startup script for Smokeping

Finally lets add Apache and Smokeping to startup and get them started:

Now browse to your new installed Smokeping and Smoketrace installation

http://www.how2centos.com/smokeping/smokeping.cgi

Gentoo lost and Debian losing to CentOS

If Linux distributions were stocks and you an investor you wish you’d have invested in CentOS. Time to sell what’s left and get yourself some steady and stable CentOS stocks, well at least according to Google Insights.